Winter Count by Barry Holstun Lopez: front coverWinter Count by Barry Holstun Lopez: back cover

Winter Count by Barry Holstun Lopez (1993 Paperback)


£10.00

Good condition used 1993 Edition Paperback.

Published by Avon Books, New York, USA.
Author: Barry Holstun Lopez.
Illustrations by Ted Lewin.
ISBN: 0380719371.
Approx dims: 205mm h x 135mm w x 10mm d.

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Winter Count by Barry Holstun Lopez

Condition and Description:

Good condition used 1993 Edition Paperback.

Published by Avon Books, New York, USA.
Author: Barry Holstun Lopez. Illustrations by Ted Lewin.
ISBN: 0380719371.
Approx dims: 205mm h x 135mm w x 10mm d.

Intact clean, slightly sunned condition pictorial covers with slight rubbing and signs of handling. Intact spine. 112 clean tanned pages of English text with some b&w illustrations, no inscriptions. Page ends tanned. Image shown is actual book for sale.

Synopsis of Winter Count by Barry Holstun Lopez:

This collection of ten early short stories by Barry Lopez seems written more than a little under the influence of Borges. Elegantly told, they are designed to evoke a deep sense of wonder in the reader. The settings are often remote – the open prairie, the desert – and touch on what feel like the remote worlds of other cultures and other times, especially Native American.

A flock of great blue herons descending through a snowstorm to the streets of New York. . . . A river in Nebraska disappearing mysteriously. . . . A ghostly herd of buffalo that sings a song of death. . . . A mystic who raises constellations of stones from the desert floor. . . . All these are to be found in Winter Count, the exquisite and rapturous collection by the National Book Award-winning author of Arctic Dreams.

In these resonant and unpredictable stories Barry Lopez proves that he is one of the most important and original writers at work in America today. With breathtaking skill and a few deft strokes he produces painfully beautiful scenes. Combining the real with the wondrous, he offers us a pure vision of people alive to the immediacy and spiritual truth of nature.

The title story refers to the Indian practice of keeping a record of tribal history by representing the one most significant event of each year as a picture on a buffalo robe. In this story, a modern-day scholar immersed in the subject of this lost tradition is himself lost and out of place at a conference of academics.