The Way of the Earth: Native America and the Environment: DJ front coverThe Way of the Earth: Native America and the Environment: DJ back cover & spine

The Way of the Earth: Native America and the Environment (1994 Hardback)


£15.00

Very good condition used 1994 First Edition
Hardback with intact Dust Jacket.

Published by William Morrow and Company, NY.
Author: John Bierhorst.
ISBN: 0688115608. ISBN: 9780688115609.
Approx dims: 215mm h x 150mm w x 32mm d.

1 in stock


The Way of the Earth: Native America and the Environment

Condition and Description:

Very good condition used 1994 First Edition Hardback with intact Dust Jacket.

Published by William Morrow and Company, Inc., New York, USA.
Author: John Bierhorst.
ISBN: 0688115608. ISBN: 9780688115609.
Approx dims: 215mm h x 150mm w x 32mm d.

Intact clean glossy condition dust jacket covers with slight rubbing, creasing and signs of handling. Intact spine. Dust jacket over good condition yellow/black boards. 329 clean, slightly tanned pages of English text with a some b&w illustrations, no inscriptions. Slight foxing to slightly tanned page ends. Image shown is actual book for sale.

Synopsis of The Way of the Earth: Native America and the Environment:

A collection of native American myths, parables, legends, and folklore drawn from many Indian cultures reflects the attitudes of native Americans toward the environment, conservation, and the value of the wilderness.

From a master historian, folklorist, and anthropologist, a lucid, densely fact-filled argument for Native Americans’ theories and practices of preserving the environment. To prove that they have a sophisticated system of ecology.

Bierhorst offers examples from both North and South American cultures and a sparkling array of parables and proverbs whose importance, he says, has been largely ignored.

Chapters on personality, kinship, restraint, death, and renewal are broken into sections such as “The Earth as Mother”; a rich stew of citations from a dozen or more tribal sources illumines each. The entwined lives of plants, animals, and humans are presented as dependent relationships with mythic overtones guiding the use of resources.