The Old Transport Road by Stanley Portal Hyatt: DJ front coverThe Old Transport Road by Stanley Portal Hyatt: DJ back cover & spine

The Old Transport Road by Stanley Portal Hyatt (1969 Hardback)


£20.00

Acceptable good condition used
Hardback with intact Dust Jacket.

1969 Reprint of First Edition published
by Books of Rhodesia, Bulawayo, South Africa.
Author: Stanley Portal Hyatt.
Approx dims: 225mm h x 150mm w x 25mm d.

1 in stock


The Old Transport Road by Stanley Portal Hyatt

Condition and Description:

Acceptable good condition used Hardback with intact Dust Jacket.

1969 Rhodesiana Reprint Library facsimile reproduction of the 1914 first edition
published by Books of Rhodesia, Bulawayo, South Africa.
Author: Stanley Portal Hyatt.
Approx dims: 225mm h x 150mm w x 25mm d.

Intact worn condition dust jacket with some tears, fraying to edges and corners, plus some creasing and signs of handling. Intact sunned spine. DJ over good condition blue cloth boards with slightly faded spine. 301 clean inside pages of English text with 12 b&w photographs, no inscriptions. Image shown is actual book for sale.

Synopsis The Old Transport Road by Stanley Portal Hyatt:

The author (1877-1914) was a bullock transport driver in the 1890’s between the rail head at Mafeking, in the far north of the Cape Colony, and Bulawayo, Lobengula’s capital in Matabeleland, then an important town in the newly annexed Rhodesia.

The Great Transport Road of South Africa was different from any other highways in the world. This tells the story of the remarkable pioneers who made the Road, and its effect on the settlement and economy of the lands through which it passed.

A perceptive and highly entertaining account of trek-oxen, wagons and the ways of the transport rider before the railways began to open up Central Africa.

Stanley Portal Hyatt came to Africa to seek his fortune during the 1890’s, drove supply wagons through the virgin veld for some ten years of unremitting toil and was rewarded, eventually, with little more than fond memories, financial ruin and ill-health.

Hyatt writes fluently and knowledgeably about life on “The Road”, about the unspoilt and sometimes savagely inhospitable countryside of early Rhodesia, about the skills and courage needed to get the wagons through. He writes lovingly of his fellow-riders, and of his animals. For contemporary society, and for commercially inspired “progress”, however, he has nothing but bitter contempt.

The Old Transport Road is an informative and absorbing book. It is also a tribute to those who braved the trackless wilderness by ox-wagon – men who can legitimately be compared to the 19th century pioneers of modern America.