No Passion Spent: Essays 1978-96 by George Steiner: DJ front coverNo Passion Spent: Essays 1978-96 by George Steiner: DJ back cover & spine

No Passion Spent: Essays 1978-96 by George Steiner (1996 Hardback)


£20.00

Good condition used Hardback
with intact Dust Jacket.

1996 First Edition published
by Faber & Faber, London.
Author: George Steiner.
ISBN: 0571176976.
Approx dims: 225mm h x 140mm w x 38mm d.

1 in stock

Category:

No Passion Spent: Essays 1978-96 by George Steiner

Condition and Description:

Good condition used Hardback with intact Dust Jacket.

1996 First Edition published by Faber & Faber, London.
Author: George Steiner.
ISBN: 0571176976.
Approx dims: 225mm h x 140mm w x 38mm d.

Intact clean condition dust jacket with slight creasing to edges, rubbing and signs of handling. Intact spine. DJ over good condition black boards. 430 clean tanned pages of English text, no inscriptions. Page ends tanned. Image shown is actual book for sale.

Synopsis of No Passion Spent No Passion Spent: Essays 1978-96 by George Steiner:

”This is an extraordinary collection of essays by one of this country’s most exciting and dramatic thinkers. The essays span a considerable time. But they turn on a central, compelling theme. What is meant by reading a serious text at a time when theories of language and literature question the very possibility of any agreed meaning, and at a time when new technologies seem likely to replace books as we have known them since Gutenberg. This question is brought to bear deliberately on the touchstone examples: the Bible, Homer, Shakespeare. Also on Kierkegaard and Kafka. The closely-meshed collection ends with a series of essays on the philosophic-theological underwriting of communication, with particular reference to what language tells us of Socrates and of Jesus. These essays by George Steiner, distinguished critic and Extraordinary Fellow at Churchill College, Cambridge, seek to conjoin the themes argued in such books as The Death of Tragedy, Language and Silence, After Babel and Real Presences. They speak of a profound, if sometimes troubled, joy.”