Muddy Boots and Sunday Suits: DJ front coverMuddy Boots and Sunday Suits: DJ back cover & spineMuddy Boots and Sunday Suits: title page & author pencil signature

Muddy Boots and Sunday Suits by Fred Archer (1973 1st Edition Signed Hardback)


£40.00

Good condition used Signed Hardback
with intact Dust Jacket.

1973 First Edition published by
Hodder & Stoughton Ltd, London.
Author: Fred Archer.
ISBN: 0340177462.
Approx dims: 220mm h x 145mm w x 22mm d.

1 in stock


Muddy Boots and Sunday Suits by Fred Archer

Condition and Description:

Good condition used Signed Hardback with intact Dust Jacket.

1973 First Edition published by Hodder & Stoughton Ltd, London.
Author: Fred Archer.
ISBN: 0340177462.
Approx dims: 220mm h x 145mm w x 22mm d.

Intact slightly sunned and faded condition dust jacket with a small tear to top of back DJ cover, a small chip/tear to front bottom right corner of DJ, plus slight creasing, rubbing and signs of handling. Intact slightly faded spine with creasing to top. Dust Jacket over good condition slightly faded light green boards with gold title lettering to spine. 159 clean, slightly tanned pages of English text with some b&w photo illustrations. Signed in pencil by author on inside title page, no other inscriptions.  End-paper maps of Ashton-Under-Hill. Page ends slightly tanned. Slight musty aroma to book. Image shown is actual book for sale.

Synopsis of Muddy Boots and Sunday Suits:

”Muddy Boots and Sunday Suits is autobiographical, the story of Ashton-under-Hill as the writer knew it in his childhood and youth, from the Spring of 1915 to the Autumn of 1939. He was born in a half-timbered farmhouse in this village where he still lives and where generations of Archer lived and farmed. Here are his first lively impressions of his parents, home and school, of the men who were pillars of strength about the place – the shepherd, ploughman, cattleman whose recollections ranged far back. The land first claimed Fred at the age of ten; eagerly he left the local Grammar School ahead of time to work on his father’s farm as under-cowman and ploughman’s boy. As he worked he watched, listened and grew wise in country ways.”