Knulp: Three Tales from the Life of Knulp by Hermann Hesse: front coverKnulp: Three Tales from the Life of Knulp by Hermann Hesse: back cover

Knulp: Three Tales from the Life of Knulp by Hermann Hesse (1972 UK Edition Paperback)


£30.00

Very Good condition used 1972 UK Paperback Edition.

Published by Jonathan Cape, London.
Author: Hermann Hesse.
Translator: Ralph Manheim.
Jacket Design: Alan Tunbridge.
ISBN: 0224007297.
Approx. dims: 215mm h x 140mm w x 11mm d.

1 in stock


Knulp: Three Tales from the Life of Knulp by Hermann Hesse

Condition and Description:

Very Good condition used 1972 UK Paperback Edition.

Published by Jonathan Cape, London.
Author: Hermann Hesse.
Translator: Ralph Manheim.
Jacket Design: Alan Tunbridge.
ISBN: 0224007297.
Approx. dims: 215mm h x 140mm w x 11mm d.

Intact clean condition pictorial covers with slight creasing, slight rubbing and slight signs of handling. Intact spine. Cover illustration continues/ wraps around spine. 114 clean slightly tanned inside pages of English text, no inscriptions. Page ends slightly tanned. Image shown is actual book for sale.

Synopsis of Knulp: Three Tales from the Life of Knulp:

(First English translation published in 1971 by Farrar, Straus & Giroux, NY, USA).

Published in Germany in 1915, Knulp is a novel written by Hermann Hesse which takes the form of three tales. It centres on the character of a drop-out who perpetually wanders, is dependent on friends, & who refuses to tie himself down to any particular job, place or person.

Near its end, disillusioned & weak, he goes into the forest where he begins a conversation with God. He asks God why he, Knulp, hasn’t done anything of consequence in life. He could’ve been a successful doctor or artist; he could’ve married & peacefully settled down. Knulp questions God & asks him about the purpose of his existence. God replies that he didn’t make Knulp to be any of these things. He wanted him to bring joy into the lives of people & make them feel a “homesickness for freedom.”

Upon receiving this answer, Knulp experiences peace & accepts his final passage from this world with a sense of purpose.

Also see our Poetry, Verse & Prose catalogue.