Glooscap and His Magic : Legends of the Wabanaki Indians: front coverGlooscap and His Magic : Legends of the Wabanaki Indians: back coverGlooscap and His Magic : Legends of the Wabanaki Indians: title pageGlooscap and His Magic : Legends of the Wabanaki Indians: publication pageGlooscap and His Magic : Legends of the Wabanaki Indians: contents pageGlooscap and His Magic : Legends of the Wabanaki Indians: contents pageGlooscap and His Magic : Legends of the Wabanaki Indians: typical illustration

Glooscap and His Magic: Legends of the Wabanaki Indians (1973 Paperback)


£20.00

Acceptable good reading condition used
1973 Paperback Canadian Favourites Edition.

Published by McClelland & Stewart, Canada.
Author: Kay Hill.
Illustrations: Robert Frankenburg.
ISBN: 0771041179.
Approx. dims: 195mm h x 135mm w x 10mm d.

1 in stock


Glooscap and His Magic: Legends of the Wabanaki Indians

Condition and Description:

Acceptable good reading condition used 1973 Paperback Canadian Favourites Edition.

Published by McClelland & Stewart, Toronto, Canada.
Author: Kay Hill.
Illustrations: Robert Frankenburg.
ISBN: 0771041179.
Approx. dims: 195mm h x 135mm w x 10mm d.

Intact clean creased condition pictorial covers with creased front cover, some rubbing and creasing to edges and corners, sunned back cover, signs of handling. Intact slightly rubbed spine. 189 clean tanned inside pages of English text with b&w illustrations, no inscriptions. Page ends tanned. Images shown are of actual book for sale.

Synopsis of Glooscap and His Magic: Legends of the Wabanaki Indians:

A collection of 19 short children’s Native American legends stories from the Wabanaki people, who live on the shores of the Great Lakes.

A venerable children’s song insists that the Indians of old were consistently high-minded and (“bless my soul!”) double-jointed. Perhaps so, but their favourite characters were anything but consistent in either character or physique. Their variability, the archaic symbols in their stories, and the anomalies that crept into those stories through countless retellings are not the least of the problems an adapter faces in preparing versions for children that will be comprehensible yet true to the spirit and flavour of the originals. One of the very few habitually high- minded Indian creations was the Wabanaki’s humorous benevolent demigod, Glooscap, affable hero o r final authority in scores of legends. Glooscap created a world — parts of the Maritimes and New England — where the Wabanaki, surrounded by archetypal animal characters, contended with King Winter, cruel Famine, cannibal chenoos, and cold-blooded, wizardly boooins.

Also see our Aborigine & Polynesian section.